Reflection Leads to Motivation

Something I've come to realize over the  past decade  is that looking back at the past is very difficult, but it is also an important  step in moving forward. This lesson seems to repeat itself in my life.

Something I've come to realize over the  past decade  is that looking back at the past is very difficult, but it is also an important  step in moving forward. This lesson seems to repeat itself in my life.

The first time I learned this lesson was when my father was killed by a drunk driver. I was 8 years old and was devastated. I knew that if I focused on what had happened I could never move forward, so I decided I should spend my time trying to prevent others from feeling the same way I felt. I began speaking to my classmates when I was in 4th grade. After that, I continued speaking to my peers until I got into high school where they had a SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) Club. The club advocates for refraining from the use of drugs and alcohol, traffic safety, and positive decision making. Once I joined the club, I was given the opportunity to represent all SADD chapters in Pennsylvania, I got to speak on Capitol Hill, and then went on to be on a National Student Leadership Council. With each of these opportunities, I had to relive the pain of losing my father. This was extremely difficult, however, it motivated me to help others and made me a more confident, eloquent leader. My work with SADD along with speaking to DUI offenders guided me towards studying to be a substance abuse and mental health counselor in college.

 

    Towards the beginning of my second semester in college, I became very sick and was diagnosed with a large brain tumor out of the blue. I had been slightly sick for years and I was getting gradually worse, but my problems were always misdiagnosed or downplayed by doctors. They did emergency surgery and successfully removed 80% of the tumor. Now, I am slowly recovering. I find it difficult to look back on how many events I missed because I had migraines or was sick because of the tumor. I think back and see so many signs that something was wrong, but I never realized how serious it was. I have to remind myself of how brave and strong I was. I graduated high school with a good GPA, I danced in dance recitals, I spoke in front of hundreds of people, and even began college...all with a massive tumor. Though once again, all of this is painful and frustrating to look back on, it reminds me of how far I’ve come. It tells me to keep pushing as hard as I can to get better. And most of all it tells me to enjoy each and every day. So remember, even if you’ve made mistakes in the past, even if you have regrets, or you struggled, all of this makes you stronger. Do 

not look back on these things as burdens. Do not wish them away, recall the events of your past and think, “Things can only get better.” Remind yourself, “If I made it through that, I can make it through anything else that gets thrown my way”. Have a great week and keep pushing forward!